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Let's see your handspun!

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    #16
    Your sweater is so amazing! Awesome job!

    Comment


    • SpinsterJulieB
      SpinsterJulieB commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks! I love to make and wear handspun items.

    #17
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2410.JPG Views:	0 Size:	194.7 KB ID:	10984 Finished up this skein and I love all the colors. It's just from bits and pieces of fiber I had left from well I don't remember what. I may do some socks with it or fingerless mitts. I saw a Berroco free pattern I liked. https://www.berroco.com/patterns/voda. I spin on a Spinolution Mach I that was converted to a Mach II.
    Last edited by Bettymo; 07-25-2019, 08:46 AM.

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    • Carlota
      Carlota commented
      Editing a comment
      That's a cute pattern - thanks for linking. Perfect for handspun.

    • AmazedbyGrace
      AmazedbyGrace commented
      Editing a comment
      I love all of the colors. It will be very pretty knitted up or in your pretty rug that you're making!

    • Bettymo
      Bettymo commented
      Editing a comment
      Carlota Sure no problem. I'll let you know if I ever get around to doing it.

    #18
    Originally posted by Floppy2 View Post
    Won't be spun until next year but here is the process of prepping the flax plant for fiber. One picture is of the flax after it has been pulled and left to dry. The immature seeds are on the flax plant. I am not going to rett the flax until next year so I am going to pull the seeds off of the plant so that when it goes into the basement rodents don't decide to have a munching party. The combs are 4-tine wool combs. They make excellent rippers (ripping the seeds off the plants). Because the seeds were immature I fed them to the chickens. Hopefully, by 2020 I will have some of my own flax processing tools.
    Growing flax is REALLY easy. You can buy seed from here. https://www.twolooms.com/
    I had an entire thread on Ravelry on growing flax. I will explain what I did here. Find an area on your property that gets full sun all day. If you don't have a yard you can use several large garden boxes or build raised beds. Use compost (Black Kow) and a good garden soil mix. Fill the boxes if you are using them all the way to the top. Don't think they are too full. The rain will tamp down the soil and you may have to add more before the seeds are planted. If you have a bed, do the same. Amend with Black Kow compost and a good garden soil if the soil on your property is poor.

    When the frost is gone in your area and you temps are 55 to 60 degrees on a consistent basis, sprinkle your seeds on top of the soil thickly and cover lightly with soil DO NO bury the seed as you would vegetable seed. Water the seed in. Wait. If you see some of the seed on the surface of the soil don't worry about it. Cover as much of the seed as you can see. Just don't bury the seed deep into the ground. Flax likes cool temps at the start of its growth. I live in garden zone 6a so the end of March into April is my start time. Find out when spring begins for the garden zone you live in and pay attention to the daytime and evening temperatures.

    Once the seed begins to sprout, keep weeds at bay. If you don't, you won't be able to tell the flax from the weeds. Weed until the plants are above knee height and then you may have to stop. If you have kept up with the weeding you should not have too many problems with weeds; especially if you have seeded the flax thickly. The reason you do this is to crowd out the weeds and help the flax prevent lodging (falling over). As the flax grows it will begin to flower. Bees will show up and pollinate and the flowers will fall off and seed pods develop. Flax takes 100 to 110 days to develop. If you want to keep seed for the next year, keep the flax in the ground until the pods turn brown and begin the dry out. If you want a fine flax, harvest the flax right at 100 days or just after the seed pods form and the flax stems are yellow halfway up the stalk. The longer you wait the courser the flax will be.

    To harvest flax, pull it up by the roots. Don't cut flax. You will lose part of the fiber length if you cut it. Flax fiber runs from root to head. Tie the flax into bundles and set out or hang out to dry in the sun. Once the flax is dry, rip the seed heads off. You can then do one of two things. Put the flax away in a cool, dry area or rett (rot) the flax in preparation for processing. To do this, lay the dry flax out in the grass to dew rett. Or you can get some plastic storage totes as I do and water rett the flax. I do water retting because it is much faster and I like the color of the flax after water retting. I get a lovely golden flax. Dew retting will give you a silver/grey color and takes about two weeks to accomplish depending on air temp and the amount of dew you get. I rett my flax when the daytime temps are 80 degrees or better for several days.

    Do some testing as you go so that you don't over rett the flax. Take several stems and let them dry in the sun. Bend them. If the boon flakes away from the fiber easily your flax is done retting. Gather it up and hang it out to dry completely. Your flax is now ready to process.

    bjr
    Last edited by Floppy2; 07-26-2019, 12:17 PM.

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      #19
      I have never seen or know that wool could be willowed! I knew it was done for cotton to open up the fibers but had never seen it done for wool.
      https://youtu.be/xsnOTTTy1iE

      bjr

      Comment


      • Bettymo
        Bettymo commented
        Editing a comment
        Loved this. Had no idea. What do you think that book was that she had propped up? I couldn't read it
        Last edited by Bettymo; 08-01-2019, 08:55 AM.

      • Floppy2
        Floppy2 commented
        Editing a comment
        I can only see the large yellow letters but that is all. I will have to ask her what the book is. It looks like it might be about fiber, but I don't know if that is knitting or spinning.

      • fluidpaint
        fluidpaint commented
        Editing a comment
        Willowing wool! I would suspect some of our Southern sheep breeds: Gulf Coast Native and Florida Cracker would be excellent for this! Now if I could just quit WALLOWING in wool🤣

      #20
      This was SO cute I simply had to share! Keep an eye on the sheep in this clip.
      https://youtu.be/akwXPgESPgg

      bjr

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        #21
        Plowing ahead with this R project I had begun. I will need something to spindle spin white I wait for my foot to heal after surgery next week. Batts on the way.

        Comment


        • Carlota
          Carlota commented
          Editing a comment
          I like how you think.

        • yarnforall
          yarnforall commented
          Editing a comment
          Beautiful, and I hope your foot surgery goes well.

        • Floppy2
          Floppy2 commented
          Editing a comment
          Well,
          Did not think carefully about how I was going to get up stairs to find my Russian spindle to give this a test spin. Oh well.....

        #22
        Finished the first skein of black Cormo pin-drafted roving that I had processed with rainbow firestar which I had started during our Spin de Fleece. One of my goals is to work on improving my long-draw spinning, so this has been a good exercise, and m getting more consistent. I love how fast it goes, and it’s very meditative.

        Since this went well, I’m going to tackle the rest of the roving this way, and then figure out what to make. It’s already quite soft and squishy, but I’m going to lightly full the yarn using Judith Mackenzie’s method, which should help it bloom nicely.

        230 yards, worsted weight
        Spun woolen draw on Schacht Matchless, and chain-plied
        on Hansen mini-spinner.


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        Last edited by AmazedbyGrace; 08-01-2019, 05:38 PM.

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          #23
          Thought I should post here, to prove I do something besides dye commercial yarns. I try to spin a little every day (some days it ends up hours, lol). Now that most of my dyeing for Fall is done, I can spin for a full month and dye that! Top is green cotton, two ply, then some purchased, dyed tops, then some white (Merino/Silk/Bamboo, 80/10/10) which will become part of the fall dyeing. The green cotton at the top is natural, twist set with soda ash, and scoured a second time with soda ash.Click image for larger version

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          • Carlota
            Carlota commented
            Editing a comment
            That is a beautiful display of lusciousness! May I ask about the soda ash: I have quite a few skeins of natural white, cinnamon, brown and green cotton 2-ply recently spindle-spun and wheel plied. Do you recommend setting everything in soda ash before warping for towels? I want to mix the colors for some stripes and plaids. I have heard some people go directly to warping and scour later. I have soda ash but have not ever used it and do not have any idea how much or how long. Your green cotton is very striking (everything else too - enjoyed your prior posts seeing all the colors you are getting).

          #24
          Here's my latest. 221g / 7.8oz / 1689 yds of merino/silk blend from Yarnorama.

          Comment


          • yarnforall
            yarnforall commented
            Editing a comment
            Grammaresa, wow!! That is gorgeous.

          • Bettymo
            Bettymo commented
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            Gorgeous spinning and skeins. Remind me of crocus.

          • Grammaresa
            Grammaresa commented
            Editing a comment
            I'm in zone 10 so we don't see crocus here, but do get iris and pansies this color. Definitely reminds everyone of flowers!

          #25


          Here’s some of mine I gathered all in a pile!

          Comment


          • Bettymo
            Bettymo commented
            Editing a comment
            Pretty pretty pile

          • yarnforall
            yarnforall commented
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            Bettymo, thank you. 😀

          #26
          Carlota : Thank you so much! I use the method described by the Maiwa blog: Large pot with water. 1 teasp. Synthrapol (I use this from Dharma Trading, but if you don’t use/have it, Dawn dish detergent works well), 4 teasp. Soda Ash (not washing soda - just in case someone else is reading this) for each 1/2 lb. of cotton. Simmer 2 hour.

          I am not a big weaver, but my guess is the cotton will behave better when scoured (stronger), and since colored cottons change when scoured with the soda ash - they darken in color - it will help you in designing your cloth to know the correct colors.

          Post a picture when you get them scoured! I love to see other cotton spinners’ work!

          Comment


          • Carlota
            Carlota commented
            Editing a comment
            fluidpaint Thank you so much for those details for my cotton notes - shortly I will be finished spinning and ready to do the simmer - you are right: better to have more known factors going into the designing and warping. Thanks for suggesting the Maiwa resource. Yes, for sure, I will take some photos before and after.

          #27
          Spinning now for August (let’s see how much I can get done🤪_) to dye again in September. Here’s the latest. Some Tasman Comeback. Should be gorgeous overdyeing the cafe au lait color.Click image for larger version

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          • Bettymo
            Bettymo commented
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            Oh that is awesome. Haven't heard of that one, gotta look it up in my book.

          • fluidpaint
            fluidpaint commented
            Editing a comment
            Betty, the color is not acccurate. It looks more gray on my monitor, but it is actually cafe au lait colored.

          #28
          Latest off the spinnrer: 75% BFL, 25% silk (Assuming tussah). Headed for the dyepots in September...Click image for larger version

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          3 horizontal bobbins are 3-ply, vertical is 2-ply.

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          • Carlota
            Carlota commented
            Editing a comment
            I love the shine on that stuff.

          • Floppy2
            Floppy2 commented
            Editing a comment
            That sheen is a dead giveaway that there is silk! Awesome

          #29
          Haven't spun for almost a year, but did the spin a long here and got the bug again. I did some bunny for the spin a long, but decided to try to spin up something fast and a tad thick and thin. Not my best, but it was fun. Then I knit a cowl with it. I needed to do something mindless since I am knitting a Pi Shawl and it is taking forever, especially since I just tinked 3,000 stitches to get to a major unfixable boo boo. Click image for larger version

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          • fluidpaint
            fluidpaint commented
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            Love2knit, are you aware of lifelines? A smaller cotton/slick thread run through the stitches (usually at the end of a pattern repeat)? Some brands of circular knitting needles even have a slot in the cord so the lifeline is there as you knit. I don’t knit lace anymore without one; they’ve saved my bacon more than once! Of course, it means you must check your knitting after each repeat for accuracy, or you still may have to do a major think!

            I love the gradient of the cowl!

          #30
          Been practicing spinning cotton. I got some green sliver several years ago from a grower in AZ. Practiced all day and yay got some on the bobbin with quite a few mishaps. I'm not a long draw spinner so I taught myself that too. They go together.
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          • fluidpaint
            fluidpaint commented
            Editing a comment
            Hurrah! That looks great! Learning to spin cotton/long draw is like riding a bicycle; takes practice to get it right, but once learned, you don’t forget it! (Good thing about spinning cotton/long draw is you don’t scrape knees and elbows!😝). If you’re like me, grab your cotton cards, and you can still spin those “mishaps.”

            The fun part about green or brown sliver is what happens when you scour it and set the twist! The color change is really neat!

            Keep at it, Betty; you’ll have some cotton that will hopefully have at least some green to it on your plants!

            Blessings!

          • Bettymo
            Bettymo commented
            Editing a comment
            fluidpaint Thanks for cheering me on. Glad to hear that when I get back to it I won't be starting all over and can just pick up where I finally left off. I gathered up all my bits and pieces the best I could but it was very breezy outside yesterday. The info that came with the cotton also said if I wanted to darken the green to add some ammonia when scouring. Depending on how much I get, I might try that. Can't wait for my crop to come in. My cotton tree has been having the most beautiful blossoms so I know something's coming.
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